Who took the Thanksgiving Turkey? : A Thanksgiving Secret Code Mystery

Who took the Thanksgiving Turkey? : A  Thanksgiving Secret Code Mystery
Who took the Thanksgiving Turkey? : A  Thanksgiving Secret Code Mystery
Who took the Thanksgiving Turkey? : A  Thanksgiving Secret Code Mystery
Who took the Thanksgiving Turkey? : A  Thanksgiving Secret Code Mystery
Who took the Thanksgiving Turkey? : A  Thanksgiving Secret Code Mystery
Who took the Thanksgiving Turkey? : A  Thanksgiving Secret Code Mystery
Who took the Thanksgiving Turkey? : A  Thanksgiving Secret Code Mystery
Who took the Thanksgiving Turkey? : A  Thanksgiving Secret Code Mystery
File Type

PDF

(6 MB|28 pages)
Product Rating
4.0
(3 Ratings)
Standards
  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW

Mysteries are exciting for your students. My kids love them. This engaging, no-prep thanksgiving mystery activity is just what you need before the coming thanksgiving break. It includes everything your students need to solve the mystery and is academically aligned to save you time. Each clue requires students to think critically and use deductive reasoning to crack the code and decide who to eliminate from the list of suspects. Last one remaining is the culprit. A great way to support team building skills.

What you get

  • The problem
  • Suspect dossiers
  • 5 clues (can be solved in any order)
  • Answers
  • Final resolution for the teacher.

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NOTE

Each Mystery uses different combinations of codes and ciphers for students to solve. No two are the same.

And a freebie to thank you just for looking…

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Model with mathematics. Mathematically proficient students can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. In early grades, this might be as simple as writing an addition equation to describe a situation. In middle grades, a student might apply proportional reasoning to plan a school event or analyze a problem in the community. By high school, a student might use geometry to solve a design problem or use a function to describe how one quantity of interest depends on another. Mathematically proficient students who can apply what they know are comfortable making assumptions and approximations to simplify a complicated situation, realizing that these may need revision later. They are able to identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships using such tools as diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts and formulas. They can analyze those relationships mathematically to draw conclusions. They routinely interpret their mathematical results in the context of the situation and reflect on whether the results make sense, possibly improving the model if it has not served its purpose.
Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Mathematically proficient students make sense of quantities and their relationships in problem situations. They bring two complementary abilities to bear on problems involving quantitative relationships: the ability to decontextualize-to abstract a given situation and represent it symbolically and manipulate the representing symbols as if they have a life of their own, without necessarily attending to their referents-and the ability to contextualize, to pause as needed during the manipulation process in order to probe into the referents for the symbols involved. Quantitative reasoning entails habits of creating a coherent representation of the problem at hand; considering the units involved; attending to the meaning of quantities, not just how to compute them; and knowing and flexibly using different properties of operations and objects.
Evaluate expressions at specific values of their variables. Include expressions that arise from formulas used in real-world problems. Perform arithmetic operations, including those involving whole-number exponents, in the conventional order when there are no parentheses to specify a particular order (Order of Operations). For example, use the formulas V = s³ and A = 6 s² to find the volume and surface area of a cube with sides of length s = 1/2.
Total Pages
28 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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