Why Do Cancer Treatments Cause Hair Loss? - Article and Questions

Why Do Cancer Treatments Cause Hair Loss? - Article and Questions
Why Do Cancer Treatments Cause Hair Loss? - Article and Questions
Why Do Cancer Treatments Cause Hair Loss? - Article and Questions
Why Do Cancer Treatments Cause Hair Loss? - Article and Questions
Grade Levels
File Type

PDF

(164 KB)
Product Rating
Standards
NGSSMS-LS1-4
NGSSMS-LS1-1
NGSSMS-LS1-3
  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW

This one page reading comes with a 4 question reflection/understanding check at the end. The reading explains why cancer treatments may cause hair to fall out. The reading lightly explains the difference between chemotherapy and radiation therapy build student understanding of how each treatment targets cancerous cells. I hope this short reading will help students understand how cancer treatments work to find and destroy cancer cells, and how hair cells manage to get caught in the crossfire.

The questions at the end have been double printed so that you can save paper. Simply print and cut in half to distribute to students. If students do work in interactive science notebooks, the small size of the questions sheet will allow students to cut-and-paste it into their notebooks as well.

Enjoy! Please let me know what you think, and how your students responded to the reading!

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
NGSSMS-LS1-4
Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively. Examples of behaviors that affect the probability of animal reproduction could include nest building to protect young from cold, herding of animals to protect young from predators, and vocalization of animals and colorful plumage to attract mates for breeding. Examples of animal behaviors that affect the probability of plant reproduction could include transferring pollen or seeds, and creating conditions for seed germination and growth. Examples of plant structures could include bright flowers attracting butterflies that transfer pollen, flower nectar and odors that attract insects that transfer pollen, and hard shells on nuts that squirrels bury.
NGSSMS-LS1-1
Conduct an investigation to provide evidence that living things are made of cells; either one cell or many different numbers and types of cells. Emphasis is on developing evidence that living things are made of cells, distinguishing between living and non-living cells, and understanding that living things may be made of one cell or many and varied cells.
NGSSMS-LS1-3
Use argument supported by evidence for how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells. Emphasis is on the conceptual understanding that cells form tissues and tissues form organs specialized for particular body functions. Examples could include the interaction of subsystems within a system and the normal functioning of those systems. Assessment does not include the mechanism of one body system independent of others. Assessment is limited to the circulatory, excretory, digestive, respiratory, muscular, and nervous systems.
Total Pages
N/A
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
30 minutes
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