Word Mapping: Short Vowels

Word Mapping: Short Vowels
Word Mapping: Short Vowels
Word Mapping: Short Vowels
Word Mapping: Short Vowels
Word Mapping: Short Vowels
Word Mapping: Short Vowels
Word Mapping: Short Vowels
Word Mapping: Short Vowels
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This unit addresses silent -e by contrasting closed (CVC) and silent -e (CVCe) syllables. It begins by looking at how adding an -e to the end of CVC words changes the sound of the vowel and the meaning of the words. Word addition problems are posed, and students work through mapping silent-e words. They learn to drop the -e underneath the final consonant because it doesn't make its own sound. (This ensures that students are able to seamlessly add suffixes such as -s, -ed, and -ing in the future.) On subsequent days, students will learn to cross out the e and draw a breve (long vowel symbol) over the vowel sound to indicate that the e is silent but it makes the vowel say its name. They will practice reading the words as they map the words on the unit list. Finally, they will use grid paper to map the words. Other alternatives include using dry erase markers, crayons, Play-Doh, stamps, and dry erase markers on various mapping mats. These activities can easily be plugged in for additional practice after the explicit three-day instructional routine for phoneme-grapheme mapping has been completed. Smaller colored mapping mats are also included to use with magnetic letters, letter tiles, or to be displayed in pocket-charts as exemplars. Take your word work to the next level with phoneme-grapheme mapping!

Phoneme-grapheme mapping is a sequential, systematic, explicit way to help students understand that the number of sounds (phonemes) they hear in a word may vary from the number of letters that represent these sounds. Since the 44 phonemes in our language do not perfectly correspond with letters, this is powerful. Students will learn a variety of mapping techniques to demonstrate the phoneme/grapheme relationships in the English language. As students map sounds to print, they develop a metacognitive approach to decoding, encoding (spelling), and reading skills.

This unit focuses on the vowel sounds in CVCe words to make word work meaningful! The instructional routine is intended to be a 3-day process. The first day, 25-30 minutes should be allotted for the lesson with 15-20 minutes spent on the lessons on subsequent days. This is a great one-on-one intervention, but it can also successfully be used with small groups. Additional mapping mats have been included to do additional small group lessons or facilitate centers beyond the three day explicit instructional routine.

Instructional Routine:

Day One: Compile lesson word list. Choose words appropriate to students’ reading levels and provide them with colored tiles. Teach the new sound, spelling concept, and spelling pattern. Instruct students to use colored tiles to segment dictated words into phonemes (sounds). Explicitly teach students that the tiles represent sounds, not letters whenever they are working on phoneme-grapheme mapping. Immediately check each word by having students touch and say each sound. Monitor students to ensure that they are accurately mapping sound to print.

Day Two: Instruct students to read the list silently. Then lead the group in reading them chorally. Instruct students to find, point to, and say the target sound or phoneme. “Say the sound”. Next, have students find, circle, and say the letter(s)
for the target grapheme in each word. “Say the letters.” Have younger students say the sounds when circling the letters as well.

Day Three: Provide tiles and the phoneme-grapheme mapping grid. Prepare the weekly list for dictation. Dictate word. Students should say each sound and position each tile in each grid square for each sound or phoneme that is heard. (Explicitly teach that the number of grid squares typically corresponds to sounds not letters.) Point to the first tile. Say, “What do you hear?” (Students say sound.) Ask, “What do you write?” Students say the letter name, move the tile up, then write the grapheme in the square. Work through the same routine for each phoneme/grapheme on the list. Have students restate the sound/spelling relationship. Ask if they can identify any other related words that were not on the list. Have them list them on the back of the grid.

Please refer to the unit preview to see suggested word lists and examples of activities.

Total Pages
87 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
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