Word Problems: Multi-Step {September}

Format
Zip (52 MB|40 Product Pages)
Standards
$2.80
Digital Download
List Price:
$3.50
You Save:
$0.70
$2.80
Digital Download
List Price:
$3.50
You Save:
$0.70
Share this resource

Also included in

  1. This 4th grade problem solving resource is a great way to support your students’ understanding and application of mathematical practices and problem solving skills. This word problem BUNDLE gives your student real-world, multi-step word problems for an entire school year!Not only will you be provid
    $17.60
    $31.50
    Save $13.90

Description

This 4th grade problem solving resource is a great way to support your students’ understanding and application of mathematical practices and problem solving skills in just minutes a day. Word Problem of the week provides your students with real-world, multi-step word problems in a quick and engaging format!

Each word problem slide has 4 problems for easy differentiation . The provided answer sheets guide students to focus on parts of each problem and break them down into small tasks throughout the week. In just 5-10 minutes each day, students work on CCSS math standards while improving their mathematical practices.
==============================================
★ → For a video overview of the Word Problem of the Week resources click HERE

★This resource is now available at a significant savings as part of a YEAR LONG BUNDLE

==============================================
September Word Problems:
1. Pencils, Pencils, Everywhere (Back-to-School)
2. Sky High (Skyscraper Day - September 3rd)
3. Teddy Bear Collection (Teddy Bear Day - September 9th)
4. A Fortune in Fortune Cookies (Fortune Cookie Day - September 13th)
5. Cheese, Please (National Cheeseburger Day, September 18th)
-------------------------------------------------
September Focus - Rounding, Number Patterns, Addition and Subtraction, Place Value
-------------------------------------------------
A Week at a Glance
→ Monday – Make sense of the problem
→ Tuesday – Do the math and model with mathematics
→ Wednesday – check for reasonableness and construct a viable argument.
→ Thursday – Extend your thinking with and extension problem that builds from the previous problem.
→ Friday – Critique the Reasoning of Others – Students look at example student work and judge reasonableness, discuss errors, prove or disprove solutions, etc.
-------------------------------------------------
Word problems come in three variations:
1. PowerPoint presentation that helps you show just the information you want your students to see each day.
2. PDF – For full color printing or in case you do not have PowerPoint.
3. Black and White ½ sheet printable version easy to use for math journals or interactive notebooks.

Student answer sheets also come in two versions:
1. Full page “Box” answer sheet with boxes for each day of the week.
2. Flip book for interactive notebooks.

Included in this resource:
• Product Overview
• Suggestions for Use
• Word Problem CCSS Correlation Chart
• The Eight Mathematical Practices student information sheet
• Word Problem of the Week Student “Box” Work Sheet (2 versions)
• Word Problem of the Week Student Work Flip Book
• Word Problem of the Week Mathematical Practices by the Day
• Student Directions by the Day
• Word Problem of the Week printable versions for interactive notebooks (6 pages)
• Answer Key for all parts of each word problem
• Scoring Rubric for Mathematical Practices (2 pages)

This product was created to use with 4th graders and supports 4th grade CCSS. However, it would also help support older students or gifted students in younger grades.
*************************************************************************
Also Available:
October
November
December.
January
February
***************************************************************************
Thank you for considering this product! Please take a moment to check out the preview of this product in order to get a better understanding of the content and quality before purchasing. It contains many sample pages, a product overview, suggestions for use, and a look at the 5 word problems included in the product.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
♥ Want to save money on resources? Follow me by clicking the
green ★ under my store name. You will receive email notification whenever I add a new resource to my store. All new resources are offered at 50% off for the first 48 hours!

♥ ♥ Want to save EVEN MORE MONEY? Leave feedback and ratings on purchased products for TpT Credits. Use these credits toward discounts on future products.


Thank you!!
**************************************************************************
More Math Resources

Place Value Task Cards and Scoot
Interactive Symmetry Poster Set
Measurement Math Center BUNDLE
Measuring Triangles Math Center
*******************************************************************************
This product is the work of T.Danley of Literacy Loves Company. It is intended to support the implementation of the CCSS. No approval by, nor association with, the creators of the CCSS is intended or implied.

"The Common Core Standards were written and developed by The National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers. © Copyright 2010. National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers. All rights reserved."
Total Pages
40 Product Pages
Answer Key
Included with rubric
Teaching Duration
1 month
Report this Resource to TpT
Reported resources will be reviewed by our team. Report this resource to let us know if this resource violates TpT’s content guidelines.

Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Look for and make use of structure. Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 × 8 equals the well remembered 7 × 5 + 7 × 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression 𝑥² + 9𝑥 + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 × 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 – 3(𝑥 – 𝑦)² as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers 𝑥 and 𝑦.
Attend to precision. Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.
Use appropriate tools strategically. Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.
Model with mathematics. Mathematically proficient students can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. In early grades, this might be as simple as writing an addition equation to describe a situation. In middle grades, a student might apply proportional reasoning to plan a school event or analyze a problem in the community. By high school, a student might use geometry to solve a design problem or use a function to describe how one quantity of interest depends on another. Mathematically proficient students who can apply what they know are comfortable making assumptions and approximations to simplify a complicated situation, realizing that these may need revision later. They are able to identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships using such tools as diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts and formulas. They can analyze those relationships mathematically to draw conclusions. They routinely interpret their mathematical results in the context of the situation and reflect on whether the results make sense, possibly improving the model if it has not served its purpose.
Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and-if there is a flaw in an argument-explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

Reviews

Questions & Answers

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

More About Us

Keep in Touch!

Sign Up