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Work System Weekly Logs & Weekly Plans {Guide Sheets}

Work System Weekly Logs & Weekly Plans {Guide Sheets}
Work System Weekly Logs & Weekly Plans {Guide Sheets}
Work System Weekly Logs & Weekly Plans {Guide Sheets}
Work System Weekly Logs & Weekly Plans {Guide Sheets}
Work System Weekly Logs & Weekly Plans {Guide Sheets}
Work System Weekly Logs & Weekly Plans {Guide Sheets}
Work System Weekly Logs & Weekly Plans {Guide Sheets}
Work System Weekly Logs & Weekly Plans {Guide Sheets}
Product Description
Work systems help students to see what work needs to be done, how much work to complete in a given task/time period, when they will be finished, and what to do next. These logs are to help teachers track the work students do in their individual work systems or they can be used to plan for each student’s work system.

I would suggest keeping these logs in a tabbed binder or tabbed comb/spiral bound book - one tab for each student working under a work system. As students gain independence, some may be able to use these logs for themselves.

You may also consider printing the logs onto duplicate/triplicate paper to share with stakeholders.

There are different types of work systems: Left to Right, Coded/Matching, Top to Bottom, and Work Lists/Checklists. These logs work with all the different types.

If you would like to use a “color-coded” system but don’t have baskets, boxes, or folders of each of the colors, try taping or gluing colored sheets to each basket, box, or folder.

Work systems give students a level of independence, while still being under the direction of a parent, teacher, or another guiding adult.

In many cases, a work system begins with “task baskets” or “work bins” or “work boxes.”

Some students may benefit from or prefer to use folders that are numbered or color coded. In the case of folders, work “to do” can be placed in the left pocket of the folder and when in is completed, it can be moved to the right pocket of the folder. I highly recommend labeling these pockets accordingly.

If using a folder system, folder filing racks or even dishracks are a useful organizational tool for each student using a work system. If using a box/basket system, shoe racks are helpful for organization.

The work system area must be clearly defined, but can be portable or permanent.

Generally speaking, all work in the work system must be at an independent level. This is so the student can work at his or her own pace with minimal questions and develop a sense of self-confidence in his/her abilities. Work should also not require the assistance of a partner or teacher.


References

The Ten Commandments of Structured Work Systems - Autism Classroom Resources. (2013). Retrieved April 05, 2016, from http://www.autismclassroomresources.com/the-ten-commandments-of-structured-work/

Structured Work Systems:What Are They and Why Use Them? - Autism Classroom Resources. (2013). Retrieved April 05, 2016, from http://www.autismclassroomresources.com/structured-work-systemswhat-are-they/
Total Pages
23 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
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