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Wringer: An In-Depth Study with Supporting Literacy Activities

Wringer: An In-Depth Study with Supporting Literacy Activities
Wringer: An In-Depth Study with Supporting Literacy Activities
Wringer: An In-Depth Study with Supporting Literacy Activities
Wringer: An In-Depth Study with Supporting Literacy Activities
Wringer: An In-Depth Study with Supporting Literacy Activities
Wringer: An In-Depth Study with Supporting Literacy Activities
Wringer: An In-Depth Study with Supporting Literacy Activities
Wringer: An In-Depth Study with Supporting Literacy Activities
Product Description
Wringer: Novel Study (39 pages)
Comprehension is the goal (and the most mysterious part) of reading. Research shows that readers must use a number of cognitive strategies in order to process what they’ve read.
These strategies include visualizing, questioning, retelling or synthesizing, determining a reader’s purpose for reading and fix-up strategies.
The foci and questions I’ve written for Wringer address a number of these concerns. They also allow you to differentiate by asking struggling students to address the comprehension and application questions and fluent students to focus on evaluation and synthesis questions.
You will also receive;
√ an introductory lesson that establishes genre as well as primary focus for study
√task card, rationale for use, sample organizer for Questioning the Author
√Spinelli bibliography for bulletin board
√Spinelli interview that includes questions asked about Wringer
√foci and questions for all chapters
√writing off a photo task card and 9 photos
√3 articles about the Hegins pigeon shoot and culling
√differentiated graphic organizers for use when reading articles
√discussion webs to encourage debate

A few thoughts about the art of questioning:
• Remember wait-time, it takes a moment to respond to a “higher-level” question.
• Ask your children if they agree with the decisions/actions of main characters. Have them explain their POV.
• Disagree with student’s POV for the sake of disagreeing. A child should be able to defend his opinion.
• Let your students assume the role of questioners. The ability to ask a question requires understanding of the text.
• Invite children to “unpack” their thinking. Sometimes the process involved is more revealing than the actual response.
• If you are reading with a group, ask students to think-pair-share. Then have them share their partner’s response. That will promote active listening and give everyone a chance to speak.
Total Pages
39 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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