Writing Expressions Activity Game

Writing Expressions Activity Game
Writing Expressions Activity Game
Writing Expressions Activity Game
Writing Expressions Activity Game
Writing Expressions Activity Game
Writing Expressions Activity Game
Writing Expressions Activity Game
Writing Expressions Activity Game
File Type

PDF

(13 MB|18 pages)
Product Rating
Standards
  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW

I don't know about you, but working on order of operations in math can be a struggle. It can be difficult for kids to correctly take written expressions and figure out the numerical expression would be. So, I created this Frankenstein themed Order of Operations I have, Who Has/Scoot game to make it so much more fun.

In this resource, you will actually be receiving two different options to play. Both games use the exact same questions, but this gives you the flexibility to use the game in a way to best suits your students' needs. These are a great LOW PREP activity for your 5th graders.

I used the game in the middle of our Order of Operations unit so we played I Have, Who Has as a whole group. I plan to use the Scoot task cards on Halloween as a review.

These task cards offer so much flexibility that you could even have the students solve the expressions for added practice.

You will be receiving the following items with your purchase:

  • 24 Colored I Have, Who Has Task Cards
  • Directions to play I Have, Who Has
  • 24 Colored Scoot Task Cards
  • Directions to play Scoot
  • 1 Color and 1 Black and White recording sheet for Scoot
  • 1 Answer Key for Scoot

Please ask any questions before purchase. Thank you.

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Thank you, and enjoy!

Copyright© 2019 Jackie House

All rights reserved by the author.

Permission to copy for single classroom use only.

Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only. Not for public display.

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. For example, express the calculation “add 8 and 7, then multiply by 2” as 2 × (8 + 7). Recognize that 3 × (18932 + 921) is three times as large as 18932 + 921, without having to calculate the indicated sum or product.
Total Pages
18 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
30 minutes
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