Writing a Three-Paragraph Essay

Janet Cosner
59 Followers
Grade Levels
6th - 12th
Standards
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
16 pages
$4.00
$4.00
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Janet Cosner
59 Followers

Description

Students will learn to write a three-paragraph essay with an introduction in the first paragraph, the body in the second paragraph, and the conclusion in the third paragraph. The introduction intrigues the reader, gives the history of the subject, and defines the topic. The body explains, comments on, and interprets the subject using examples or reasons. The conclusion talks about the future or draws an interesting conclusion.

It should take two class periods to write a well-developed three-paragraph essay—twenty minutes to fill out the wheels and forty-five minutes to write the essay and proofread it.


Students will be able to do the following:
* brainstorm using three graphic organizers (wheels)
* write three well-developed paragraphs using complete sentences
* proofread their work
* use a rubric to evaluate their work

The 16-page PDF contains the following:
* step-by-step instructions
* example with answer key
* topics for subject-specific writing assignments
* handouts that explain the writing process
* scoring rubric for writing assignments

Materials align to the Common Core standards.



Writing a Three-Paragraph Essay by Jan Cosner is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Total Pages
16 pages
Answer Key
Rubric only
Teaching Duration
1 month
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

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