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Writing an Equation Doodle Note

Writing an Equation Doodle Note
Writing an Equation Doodle Note
Writing an Equation Doodle Note
Writing an Equation Doodle Note
Writing an Equation Doodle Note
Writing an Equation Doodle Note
Writing an Equation Doodle Note
Writing an Equation Doodle Note
Created ByMath Giraffe
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PDFΒ (1 MB|1 plus answer keys & info)
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$1.75
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Add notes & annotations through an interactive layer and assign to students via Google Classroom.
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Math Giraffe

Math Giraffe

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Steps for solving a problem by writing an equation - visual interactive "doodle notes"

Students are guided through graphic notes for math problem solving through "Read, Understand, Plan, Write, Solve, and Check."

When students color or doodle in math class, it activates both hemispheres of the brain at the same time. There are proven benefits of this cross-lateral brain activity:

- new learning

- relaxation (less math anxiety)

- visual connections

- better memory & retention of the content!

Students fill in the sheets, answer the questions, and color, doodle or embellish. Then, they can use it as a study guide later on. Graphic doodle and sketch notes take full advantage of Dual Coding Theory (the way brains process visual and linguistic information) to maximize retention.

Content includes:

- problem solving strategy - Write a Equation

- steps for the process

- understanding what the algebraic equation needs to be

- defining variables

- writing, solving, and checking the solution

- practice examples

- visuals and room for creativity & interaction

Check out the preview for more detail about this item and the research behind it.

Visual note taking strategies like sketch notes or doodle notes are based on dual coding theory.Β  When we can blend the text input with graphic/visual input, the student brain processes the information differently and can more easily convert the new learning into long-term memory.

This strategy also integrates the left and right hemispheres of the brain to increase focus, learning, and retention!

Loving the doodle notes? Grab the full book of Pre-Algebra doodle notes here:

Pre Algebra Doodle Note Book

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Mathematically proficient students make sense of quantities and their relationships in problem situations. They bring two complementary abilities to bear on problems involving quantitative relationships: the ability to decontextualize-to abstract a given situation and represent it symbolically and manipulate the representing symbols as if they have a life of their own, without necessarily attending to their referents-and the ability to contextualize, to pause as needed during the manipulation process in order to probe into the referents for the symbols involved. Quantitative reasoning entails habits of creating a coherent representation of the problem at hand; considering the units involved; attending to the meaning of quantities, not just how to compute them; and knowing and flexibly using different properties of operations and objects.
Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, "Does this make sense?" They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.
Solve linear equations with rational number coefficients, including equations whose solutions require expanding expressions using the distributive property and collecting like terms.
Solve linear equations in one variable.
Solve word problems leading to equations of the form 𝘱𝘹 + 𝘲 = 𝘳 and 𝘱(𝘹 + 𝘲) = 𝘳, where 𝘱, 𝘲, and 𝘳 are specific rational numbers. Solve equations of these forms fluently. Compare an algebraic solution to an arithmetic solution, identifying the sequence of the operations used in each approach. For example, the perimeter of a rectangle is 54 cm. Its length is 6 cm. What is its width?
Total Pages
1 plus answer keys & info
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
30 minutes
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