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Bucketball Experiment Activity & Task

Grade Levels
8th - 10th, Homeschool
Standards
Resource Type
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
18 pages

Description

The Bucketball Experiment Activity & Task gives students an opportunity to practice gathering random data, organizing that data into a table, and then determining the relative frequency of the data in a context that is fun and personal. This activity/task has two parts. First students participate in the Bucketball Experiment Activity and record their raw data. Once that is completed and shared between teams, students will partner up to complete the second part, Bucketball Experiment Task. This task asks students to complete a two-way frequency table and then use the results to find solutions.

Students will:

1. Participate in the Bucketball Experiment Activity.

2. Record random data in real time.

3. Organize data into a two-way frequency table.

4. Determine the relative frequency of the collected data.

5. Apply the frequency data to find real solutions.

The Bucketball Experiment Activity & Task is a great activity for the middle of a unit on statistics & probability. Students need to know how to find percentage rates from a fraction before beginning this task. I have students use a calculator to keep the focus on probability and statistics concepts rather than long division. The activity and task take 60 to 90 minutes to complete depending on the mathematical level of the students. Students with average or advanced mathematical skills will complete this task in 60 minutes. Struggling students and English Language Learners may need 90 minutes. This product focuses on Common Core Math Standards: HSS.ID.B.5, HSN.Q.A.2, HSN.Q.A.3, 8.SP.A.4, MP1, MP2, MP4, and MP5.

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Total Pages
18 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
1 hour
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Use appropriate tools strategically. Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.
Model with mathematics. Mathematically proficient students can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. In early grades, this might be as simple as writing an addition equation to describe a situation. In middle grades, a student might apply proportional reasoning to plan a school event or analyze a problem in the community. By high school, a student might use geometry to solve a design problem or use a function to describe how one quantity of interest depends on another. Mathematically proficient students who can apply what they know are comfortable making assumptions and approximations to simplify a complicated situation, realizing that these may need revision later. They are able to identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships using such tools as diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts and formulas. They can analyze those relationships mathematically to draw conclusions. They routinely interpret their mathematical results in the context of the situation and reflect on whether the results make sense, possibly improving the model if it has not served its purpose.
Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Mathematically proficient students make sense of quantities and their relationships in problem situations. They bring two complementary abilities to bear on problems involving quantitative relationships: the ability to decontextualize-to abstract a given situation and represent it symbolically and manipulate the representing symbols as if they have a life of their own, without necessarily attending to their referents-and the ability to contextualize, to pause as needed during the manipulation process in order to probe into the referents for the symbols involved. Quantitative reasoning entails habits of creating a coherent representation of the problem at hand; considering the units involved; attending to the meaning of quantities, not just how to compute them; and knowing and flexibly using different properties of operations and objects.
Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, "Does this make sense?" They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.
Summarize categorical data for two categories in two-way frequency tables. Interpret relative frequencies in the context of the data (including joint, marginal, and conditional relative frequencies). Recognize possible associations and trends in the data.

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