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Division and Operations Introduction and Rigorous Activities

Division and Operations Introduction and Rigorous Activities
Division and Operations Introduction and Rigorous Activities
Division and Operations Introduction and Rigorous Activities
Division and Operations Introduction and Rigorous Activities
Division and Operations Introduction and Rigorous Activities
Division and Operations Introduction and Rigorous Activities
Division and Operations Introduction and Rigorous Activities
Division and Operations Introduction and Rigorous Activities
Product Description
This is a compilation of notes on the process of dividing, a graphic organizer for subtraction and division, a graphic organizer for division, and 10 different division and other operations activities. They are rigorous activities that require students to reread problems, write out explanations and reasonings, determine what operation to use to solve problems, interpret remainders, apply place value and other number property skills, and create and apply a thought process for themselves that they can use for any problem. There are also some introductory activities that can be used as such or as remediation.

The activities are as follows:

Division Notes and Graphic Organizer: These notes and the line of questioning can be used to guide the students’ thinking when teaching division. Despite the context of the problem, they can use that line of questioning (about the gifts). My students caught on very quickly and used those questions every time. The graphic organizer is a good way for them to record the groups, number in each group, and total so they can determine what operation to use to solve the problem. It also helps when showing them the difference between subtraction and division problems.

Basic Division Problems: These two activities (School Feast Project and the 10 problem cards following it) contain problems that are good to use to introduce division, review division, or remediate students who are struggling. You can use them in centers, whole class, partner activities, or as questions for a game (all you have to do is get or make a game board and let the students use it to play a game where they have answer the question. If they get it correct, they roll the dice and move that many spaces. If they are incorrect, the other team/player can answer it and move forward 1 space. Then, they switch turns).


Operations: This activity requires students to read the problem or scenario, write what operation they will use, why they will use that operation, what the four related facts are, what the answer is (the value of the variable in the problem), what the remainder is (if there is one), explain their answers, complete a diagram, and then requires them to create a scenario of their own and then write questions about it.
Differentiation: You can have the struggling students complete fewer parts, and have your average and higher students complete all parts and create 1 or more scenarios with 5 or more related questions.


Operations Christmas Activity: In this activity, the students first answer the questions in the boxes. They are a mixture of operations and the students have to determine what operation to use to solve them. Then, they will create a Christmas scene. They will use riddles that correspond to each of the answers to create certain items in the scene. They have to answer the riddles using the answers to their questions before they can create their scene. They use construction paper (or whatever other paper you choose for them to use) for the scene. The riddles include place value skills, multiples, factors, and other number properties.


Birthday Party and Christmas Party Tasks: In these tasks, students will use multiplication and division to complete the questions, diagrams, and determine the reasonableness of answers. They are given a scenario and have to go back to reread it to determine what information they need and use it to solve the problems.


Division Christmas Part 2: This is a short, 6-problem question set that can be used as a bell ringer, a mini-quiz, or a way to introduce, review, or remediate division with remainders. It makes the students answer the problem and identify and express the remainder.


Division with Remainders: This is a 4-page problem set that forces students to write what the problem is asking (what they want to know), what information is given in the problem (what do we know), the operation required to solve the problem, the answer to the problem, and the four related facts:
• groups x # in each group = total;
• # in each group x groups = total;
• total ÷ groups = # in each group;
• total ÷ # in each group = groups.
Not all of the problems are division. Some are multiplication, and the rest are division. There are no basic facts in these problems, and some of the division problems have remainders and ask for the remainder, so the students have to identify what the remainder is and answer the problem properly.

Operations Game Boards: In this activity, students will answer the questions in the rectangles and then glue them in their proper spots on the game boards. They will glue them according to what operation they used to solve the problem. It does not matter in which order they glue them, as long as the problems are in the correct sections of the Venn Diagram. The board has arrows on it indicating the direction of play. Once the game board problems are solved (they will write their answers in the little space next to the problem on the rectangle) and glued, the students may then use their game boards to play games (review facts with each other, answer other word problems, etc.). It may be helpful to laminate the finished board, put it in a sheet protector, or copy the game board on cardstock.
Differentiation: Have lower students only complete some problems and not complete the multiplication and division or the addition and subtraction problems. Have those already glued on the board for them. Have higher students complete all problems and generate problems of their own.

Division Christmas Activity: In this activity, the students first answer the 18 questions on the first page. They are a mixture of multiplication and division, and the students have to determine which operation to use to solve them. Then, they will decorate a Christmas tree. They will use riddles that correspond to each of the answers to create certain ornaments or items on the tree. They have to answer the riddles using the answers to their questions before they can create their tree. They use a construction paper cutout of a tree (or whatever other tree you choose for them to use). The riddles include place value skills, multiples, factors, and other number properties.
Total Pages
49 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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