Easel by TpT

To Kill a Mockingbird: Literary Analysis with Sticky Notes

Grade Levels
8th - 11th
Standards
Resource Type
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
28 pages
$4.99
$4.99
Share this resource

Description

Increase student engagement and understanding as you read Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird with these interactive and hands-on sticky note literary analysis organizers. Students will enjoy using sticky notes in class as they analyze complex short stories and novels.

This sticky note literary analysis activity unit includes 13 sticky note organizers (6 with built-in writing prompts) and answer keys.

Included Sticky Note Literary Analysis Organizers:

  • Jigsaw Organizer (use with any three literary elements)
  • Figurative Language Organizer
  • Direct vs. Indirect Characterization Organizer with Writing Prompt
  • Character Development Organizer (Scout)
  • Character Development Organizer (Jem)
  • Character Development Organizer (Atticus)
  • Character Development Organizer (choose a character)
  • Conflict Organizer
  • Internal and External Conflict Organizer with Writing Prompt
  • Symbol Organizer
  • Symbol Organizer with Writing Prompt
  • Tone Organizer with Writing Prompt
  • Setting Organizer with Writing Prompt

All of the organizers have a suggested answer key except for the Jigsaw and choose a character organizers.

Other To Kill a Mockingbird Teaching Resources

To Kill a Mockingbird Teaching Unit

SMARTePlans To Kill a Mockingbird Digital Teaching Unit

Harper Lee and To Kill a Mockingbird Bell Ringers

Total Pages
28 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
1 month
Report this Resource to TpT
Reported resources will be reviewed by our team. Report this resource to let us know if this resource violates TpT’s content guidelines.

Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful.
Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Reviews

Questions & Answers

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

More About Us

Keep in Touch!

Sign Up